Colin Bruce Milne/cbmilne33
assholeofday:

Terri Lynn Land, Asshole of the Day for August 19, 2014
by TheDailyEdge (Follow @TheDailyEdge)
August 19 is Earth Overshoot Day. It’s the day on which “humanity has exhausted nature’s budget for the year.” As the global population and demand for natural resources both increase, Earth Overshoot Day comes earlier and earlier each year. Which is why we really need to, as the GOP candidate for Senate in Michigan Terri Lynn Land says, “respect the environment.”
Unfortunately, Terri Lynn Land is to environmental deficits what Dick Cheney is to budget deficits. She thinks, where she’s concerned at least, they don’t matter.
Land’s "Respect the Environment" energy policy is the usual Tea Party grab-bag of Koch-enriching, planet-destroying ideas, with the Keystone XL pipeline as its centerpiece. But to make it even worse, the page also features a colorful picture of “Terri’s Truck.”
As Eclectablog points out, the truck in question is an “International Commercial Extreme Truck,” weighing in at 14,500 pounds and getting an embarrassing 8-10 miles per gallon.
There are many reasons why Land’s policies will be a disaster for Michigan and the USA. But on Earth Overshoot Day, it’s worth pointing out, they’ll be a planetary disaster too.
This is Land’s first time as Asshole of the Day.
Full story: http://www.eclectablog.com/2014/08/terri-lynn-lands-campaign-is-a-visible-demonstration-of-waste-excess-with-a-100k-truck-that-gets-8-mpg.html

assholeofday:


Terri Lynn Land, Asshole of the Day for August 19, 2014

by TheDailyEdge ()

August 19 is Earth Overshoot Day. It’s the day on which “humanity has exhausted nature’s budget for the year.” As the global population and demand for natural resources both increase, Earth Overshoot Day comes earlier and earlier each year. Which is why we really need to, as the GOP candidate for Senate in Michigan Terri Lynn Land says, “respect the environment.”

Unfortunately, Terri Lynn Land is to environmental deficits what Dick Cheney is to budget deficits. She thinks, where she’s concerned at least, they don’t matter.

Land’s "Respect the Environment" energy policy is the usual Tea Party grab-bag of Koch-enriching, planet-destroying ideas, with the Keystone XL pipeline as its centerpiece. But to make it even worse, the page also features a colorful picture of “Terri’s Truck.”

As Eclectablog points out, the truck in question is an “International Commercial Extreme Truck,” weighing in at 14,500 pounds and getting an embarrassing 8-10 miles per gallon.

There are many reasons why Land’s policies will be a disaster for Michigan and the USA. But on Earth Overshoot Day, it’s worth pointing out, they’ll be a planetary disaster too.

This is Land’s first time as Asshole of the Day.

Full story: http://www.eclectablog.com/2014/08/terri-lynn-lands-campaign-is-a-visible-demonstration-of-waste-excess-with-a-100k-truck-that-gets-8-mpg.html

imjohnlocked:

playfulconversation:

this is literally the greatest post on tumblr

this post was sent from heaven

imjohnlocked:

playfulconversation:

this is literally the greatest post on tumblr

this post was sent from heaven

glight1994:

icyarguments:

Because why go outside (gasp!) and get involved when you can just like and reblog posts from the comfort of your home.

Because sometimes you’re young, and can’t leave your area, or parents won’t let You get involved. so the only thing you can do is spread the message so someone who can help will see it. 

"Aaaand made a comic to make people feel bad about themselves, when I’m not doing anything either. Gee that was good use of my time." 

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  Today, I begin a Koons-o-rama. Once a week for the next little while, the Daily Pic will visit and revisit the almost-perfect Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. I have huge respect for my fellow critics who feel that Koons is nothing more than a  symptom of everything that’s wrong with our art world, and maybe with our culture in general. On my first visit to the show, to shoot a video with my chum Christian Viveros-Fauné, I almost let him convince me that Koons was precisely as bankrupt and shallow a figure as his fiercest critics say. Since then, I’ve spent longer with the Koons show than with almost any display I can remember (with the very notable exception of my week-long inspection of “Las Meninas” at the Prado). On visit after visit, accompanied by any number of deep thinkers on art, I’ve found that Koons has payed major intellectual and visual dividends.  His art is simply too productive to be dismissed. I feel as though his haters’ larger, principled – and admirable – objection to certain Koonsian trends in art-world dynamics have blinded them to the details of what Koons has produced. 
Today’s Daily Pic, for instance, shows the Whitney digging deep into a little-known prehistory of Koonsiana. It turns out that as far back as 1979,  Koons was acquiring and displaying product  from some of the stranger corners of popular culture. With “Inflatable Flowers (Short Pink, Tall Purple)”, he makes us want to know how it was that certain late-70s tchotchke producers felt it worth their while to make dumb inflatable flowers with such complex engineering. Koons so appreciates this redundant complexity that he displays his vinyl blossoms on mirrors, just as museums show Fabergé eggs, so that we can take in their details from every side.
Here’s another peculiarity of these works as shown at the Whitney: Koons cares so much about the details of his original vinyl flowers that he has had them laboriously refabricated for this retrospective, making sure that passing time and decaying matter would have no leverage on their appearance. That means that they pass out of the realm of normal Duchampian readymades – objects purchased and presented as art, mostly for the sake of the gesture itself – into a new realm of “re-made readymades”, where the objects themselves matter as much as the action of showing them. (At the risk of once again incurring the wrath of some of the more simpleminded Duchampians, let me say that I consider Marcel’s artisanal remakes of his classic found objects something else altogether than Koons’s; Duchamp’s 1950s urinals are not a recapitulation of the original Dada works, but a piss-taking new riff on what “Fountain” had come to mean.)
On one visit to the Koons retrospective, the room with his vinyl flowers was full of tiny children whose art teacher had told them to draw Koons’s inflatables. This struck me at the time as one of the more colossal misunderstandings that I’d  witnessed in a museum: Works of tremendous conceptual complexity were being used to teach kids the most conservative notions of what art should be. But then I was forced to rethink. One of the glories of Koons’s works is that every one of them is a kind of Trojan horse, coming across at first as the simplest, dumbest aesthetic gift, and then turning out to ambush almost every conventional artistic model. I’m afraid to say that some of my Koons-hating colleagues may be a bit like those Koons-sketching kids: They’re stuck on first impressions of the art, and that keeps them from feeling obliged to look deeper. (Collection of Norman and Norah Stone; ©Jeff Koons) 
The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  Today, I begin a Koons-o-rama. Once a week for the next little while, the Daily Pic will visit and revisit the almost-perfect Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. I have huge respect for my fellow critics who feel that Koons is nothing more than a  symptom of everything that’s wrong with our art world, and maybe with our culture in general. On my first visit to the show, to shoot a video with my chum Christian Viveros-Fauné, I almost let him convince me that Koons was precisely as bankrupt and shallow a figure as his fiercest critics say. Since then, I’ve spent longer with the Koons show than with almost any display I can remember (with the very notable exception of my week-long inspection of “Las Meninas” at the Prado). On visit after visit, accompanied by any number of deep thinkers on art, I’ve found that Koons has payed major intellectual and visual dividends.  His art is simply too productive to be dismissed. I feel as though his haters’ larger, principled – and admirableobjection to certain Koonsian trends in art-world dynamics have blinded them to the details of what Koons has produced. 

Today’s Daily Pic, for instance, shows the Whitney digging deep into a little-known prehistory of Koonsiana. It turns out that as far back as 1979,  Koons was acquiring and displaying product  from some of the stranger corners of popular culture. With “Inflatable Flowers (Short Pink, Tall Purple)”, he makes us want to know how it was that certain late-70s tchotchke producers felt it worth their while to make dumb inflatable flowers with such complex engineering. Koons so appreciates this redundant complexity that he displays his vinyl blossoms on mirrors, just as museums show Fabergé eggs, so that we can take in their details from every side.

Here’s another peculiarity of these works as shown at the Whitney: Koons cares so much about the details of his original vinyl flowers that he has had them laboriously refabricated for this retrospective, making sure that passing time and decaying matter would have no leverage on their appearance. That means that they pass out of the realm of normal Duchampian readymades – objects purchased and presented as art, mostly for the sake of the gesture itself – into a new realm of “re-made readymades”, where the objects themselves matter as much as the action of showing them. (At the risk of once again incurring the wrath of some of the more simpleminded Duchampians, let me say that I consider Marcel’s artisanal remakes of his classic found objects something else altogether than Koons’s; Duchamp’s 1950s urinals are not a recapitulation of the original Dada works, but a piss-taking new riff on what “Fountain” had come to mean.)

On one visit to the Koons retrospective, the room with his vinyl flowers was full of tiny children whose art teacher had told them to draw Koons’s inflatables. This struck me at the time as one of the more colossal misunderstandings that I’d  witnessed in a museum: Works of tremendous conceptual complexity were being used to teach kids the most conservative notions of what art should be. But then I was forced to rethink. One of the glories of Koons’s works is that every one of them is a kind of Trojan horse, coming across at first as the simplest, dumbest aesthetic gift, and then turning out to ambush almost every conventional artistic model. I’m afraid to say that some of my Koons-hating colleagues may be a bit like those Koons-sketching kids: They’re stuck on first impressions of the art, and that keeps them from feeling obliged to look deeper. (Collection of Norman and Norah Stone; ©Jeff Koons)

The Daily Pic also appears at ArtnetNews.com. For a full survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive

liz-pls:

I’m only sharing tweets for those who are not on twitter and can’t see how passionate and outraged journalists are as they tweet from #Ferguson.

If you are on Twitter, here’s a good roster of people to follow if you want to keep updated.